When you disclose a problem to the buyer that has previously been fixed, be sure to provide a copy of work orders, receipts, and invoices. If the problem hasn't been fixed, expect the buyer to either ask you to fix it, or to offer a little less for the home.

Remember, the more that are left unrepaired, the more the buyer will discount the offer if he makes one at all. Homes in the best condition sell the best.

The seller's disclosure is designed to do one thing -- hold you and your real estate agent harmless if you've disclosed the truth about your property. You don't want to give the buyer any room for complaint or litigation after the closing.

To get an idea of the types of questions you'll be asked in a disclosure, you can find legal forms at FindLegalForms.com.

So, don't be afraid of the seller's disclosure. It's not meant to be a deal-killer, but a deal-maker. Many agents provide a copy of the disclosure to interested buyers, so they can get an idea of the home's condition before they make an offer or have an inspection.